How long does tiramisu last in the fridge?

In this article, we will answer the question “How long does tiramisu last in the fridge?”, how long does tiramisu last on the counter, how to store tiramisu, how to defrost tiramisu, how to tell if the tiramisu is spoiled, and how to make the best tiramisu at home.

How long does tiramisu last in the fridge?

Tiramisu does not last more than 3 days in the fridge. The presence of ladyfingers limits the shelf-life of tiramisu by altering its texture. The high moisture content of tiramisu is the ultimate culprit.

How long does tiramisu last on the counter?

Tiramisu is not meant to be stored on the counter. It contains egg custard that cannot last more than 2 hours at room temperature without the risk to food safety. However, it is recommended to let the tiramisu rest at room temperature for 10-15 minutes right before serving.

How to store tiramisu?

Refrigeration is mandatory for tiramisu. Refrigerating the tiramisu at a steady temperature delays its degradation and preserves its texture and flavor. Your best bet is to use good quality air-tight containers for refrigerating tiramisu.

If you make your tiramisu in cups, cover the cup mouths with saran wrap. For bonus protection, you can put the saran-wrapped tiramisu cups in an air-tight container. Alternatively, you can place the saran-wrapped tiramisu on a tray. Then saran-wrap the tray to seal it properly. 

How to defrost tiramisu?

Shift the tiramisu from the freezer into the fridge an hour before serving. Letting the tiramisu defrost in the fridge is the safest way to defrost it. Letting your tiramisu on the counter compromises its safety.

How to tell if the tiramisu is spoiled?

Texture: Nobody likes a mushy tiramisu. The texture change happens when the mascarpone cheese expires. 

Odor: Spoiled tiramisu will smell similar to any spoiled dairy product. If you notice your tiramisu giving off a sour or weird odor, discard it.

Taste: A bad-tasting tiramisu is of no use. If your tiramisu develops a sour, or rancid taste, get rid of it.

Mold: Exposure to air introduces mold spores into the tiramisu. Once the spores get in, they grow slowly and lead to spoilage. The presence of mold in your tiramisu is a strong indication of spoilage. Discard the moldy tiramisu right away.

How to make tiramisu from scratch?

Ingredients 

For the cream 

  • 4 large egg yolks
  • ½ cup/100 grams granulated sugar, divided
  • ¾ cup heavy cream

For the assembly 

  • 1 ¾ cups good espresso or very strong coffee
  • 2 tablespoons rum or cognac
  • 2 tablespoons unsweetened cocoa powder
  •  About 24 ladyfingers (from one 7-ounce/200-gram package)
  • 1 to 2 ounces bittersweet chocolate, for shaving (optional)

Instructions 

  1. Whisk the egg yolks and 1/4 cup/50 grams of sugar using an electric mixer. The goal is to achieve a light yellow color, more than double the original volume, and a soft and fluffy texture. Transfer this mixture to a clean bowl by scraping it using a spatula. 
  1. In a separate bowl, beat the cream and remaining 1/4 cup/50 grams of sugar until you get soft peaks. Then beat in the mascarpone until well-combined. Pour this mixture into the egg yolk and sugar mixture. Fold the mixture using a spatula.
  1. In another bowl, mix rum and espresso.
  1. Dust the 2-quart baking dish with cocoa powder. You could also use an 8-8 or 9-inch baking pan.
  1. Lined the bottom of the pan with espresso-soaked ladyfingers. Break the ladyfingers to fill the bottom of the pan entirely, if need may be. Then spread a layer of mascarpone on top of the ladyfinger layer. Add a similar layer on top.
  1. Finish off by dusting cocoa powder and shaved chocolate on top.
  1. Plastic-wrap the bowl and refrigerate at least 4 hours before devouring.

Conclusion 

In this article, we answered the question “How long does tiramisu last in the fridge?”, how long does tiramisu last on the counter, how to store tiramisu, how to defrost tiramisu, how to tell if the tiramisu is spoiled, and how to make the best tiramisu at home.

References 

https://cooking.nytimes.com/recipes/1018684-classic-tiramisu

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