Why do I get nauseous every time I eat? 

In this brief article, we are going to answer the question, “Why do I get nauseous every time I eat?”

Why do I get nauseous every time I eat? 

Food poisoning, hepatitis, an ulcer, and bulimia are all possible causes of nausea every time you eat or it may simply be dehydration. Being dehydrated throughout the course of the day may cause you to feel nausea right after eating.

Young children are more likely to get dehydrated, specifically if they have diarrhea, due to their inability to verbalize dehydration symptoms. Drying of lips and mouth, dead eyes, and fast breathing or pulse are all indications of dehydration that should be observed by adults caring for unwell children. 

A disease known as hyperemesis gravidarum can develop in pregnant women, where fluid or mineral imbalances can put their lives or the lives of their unborn children in jeopardy.

Feeling nauseous between one to eight hours after eating may suggest food poisoning as well. Salmonella, on the other hand, might take up to 72 hours to exhibit symptoms after exposure to food.

There may be clues to the reason based on the timing of your nausea or vomiting.

A more serious disease might sneak up on you if you’re vomiting more than usual. Meningitis, intestinal obstruction, appendicitis, as well as brain tumors are all dangerous illnesses that can cause nausea and vomiting.

What Is the Reason for Vomiting or Nausea?

There are several disorders that cause nausea and vomiting, but they are not diseases.

Seasickness and motion sickness are also examples of this.

During the first few months of pregnancy (nausea occurs in approximately fifty percent to ninety percent of all pregnancies; vomiting in 25 percent -55 percent )

  • Vomiting induced by medication.
  • An excruciating amount of discomfort.
  • Stress in the mind and body.
  • illness of the gallbladder.
  • gastrointestinal illness as a result of contaminated food.
  • Diseases such as the “stomach flu”.
  • Overeating
  • Smell-induced physical or psychological response
  • Myocardial infarction
  • A brain injury or concussion
  • a tumor in the head
  • Ulcers
  • A few types of cancer
  • Anorexia nervosa or other mental diseases
  • A disorder known as gastroparesis, or a sluggish emptying of the stomach.
  • Toxins or excessive alcohol consumption
  • Obstruction of the bowel
  • Appendicitis

Vomiting reasons vary from child to child. Vomiting can be caused by a viral disease, foodborne illness, milk allergies, motion sickness, overeat or feeding, coughing, or clogged intestines in youngsters.

There may be clues to the reason based on the timing of your nausea or vomiting. Foodborne illness, gastritis, an ulcer, or bulimia are all possible causes of nausea or vomiting after a meal. 

One to eight hours after eating, nausea or vomiting may suggest food poisoning as well. Salmonella, on the other hand, might take up to 72 hours to exhibit symptoms after exposure to food.

Symptoms of Nausea and Vomiting that indicate a visit to the Doctor.

If the nausea persists for more than some days, or if you suspect you could be pregnant, consult your doctor.

There may be a known ailment (such as a brain injury or infection) causing the vomiting if the home remedy does not work.

Consult a doctor for vomiting lasting more than one day; dehydration; diarrhea lasting more than 24 hours; or other indicators of dehydration if symptoms persist for longer than 24 hours.

Speak to your pediatrician if a baby or child is vomiting for over an hour or showing indications of dehydration (such as a low body temperature or a fever), diarrhea, or not peeing for at least six hours.

If a kid over the age of six hasn’t urinated in six hours or has had vomiting and diarrhea for more than 24 hours, is showing any indications of dehydration, has a temperature above 101 degrees, or hasn’t had any indicators of dehydration, they should be seen by a doctor.

How to prevent Nausea?

Preventing nausea can be accomplished in a number of ways.

  • Replace three substantial meals with several smaller ones throughout the day.
  • Slowly eat your food.
  • Avoid meals that are difficult to digest.
  • The fragrance of hot or warm meals may cause nausea, therefore it’s best to consume chilled or room temperature food instead.
  • Recuperate with your feet approximately 12 inches above the level of your heart after eating.
  • Rather than consuming liquids during meals, drink them between meals.
  • When you are less nauseous, it is best to eat.

Conclusion

In this brief article, we answered the question, “Everytime I eat I get nauseous.”

References

https://www.webmd.com/digestive-disorders/digestive-diseases-nausea-vomiting#

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